Fling A Bat! A Fun Halloween-Themed DIY Idea!

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I'm all about DIY activities in speech, and one of my students loved this Fling the Bat Halloween-themed activity! Click through to read how it works!

I am always searching for fun ways to use dollar store items in my speech room.   Today, I used my Target Halloween bins, package of bats I got from a dollar store, index cards, a mirror, and Natalie Snyder's brilliant idea of a disposable dental floss.

I'm all about DIY activities in speech, and one of my students loved this Fling the Bat Halloween-themed activity! Click through to read how it works!

I took 3 bins, and labeled them beginning, middle, and end.  I gave my student a dental floss (and a tissue to place it on — that is KEY!), a mirror, and a set of 10 bats.

I'm all about DIY activities in speech, and one of my students loved this Fling the Bat Halloween-themed activity! Click through to read how it works!

My student had to listen to the /r/ word I provided, and distinguish the location of the target sound.  Then, he had to repeat the word as he threw the various bats into the correct bin.

I'm all about DIY activities in speech, and one of my students loved this Fling the Bat Halloween-themed activity! Click through to read how it works!

What did this accomplish?

  • Tons of auditory bombardment
  • 10 productions for each target word
  • Motivation!
I got so much data!  I even kept score and made a “bet” with this student, that if he got 10 points he could pick 2 prizes from my prize bin.  He clearly got his goal!
I'm all about DIY activities in speech, and one of my students loved this Fling the Bat Halloween-themed activity! Click through to read how it works!
Since we are working on carryover, my list consisted of single syllable and multi-syllabic words.  My data on this form was to gather whether or not my student was able to identify if he produced his target correct or incorrect.  If I used a – and then a circle around the mark above, that meant he knew to use his dental floss to help him with placement independently.  If I gave him a + and then a circle, that meant that he used the dental floss to produce it independently the first time.  I find the – and + plus circle system works for me!   I understand it and am able to jot down data into my data book afterwards to explain how the student did.

My student loved this fling the bat activity and it was so much fun watching him have fun and work on his /r/ sound!

I bet you want to check out another Halloween activity, don't you? I think you'll like this one!