Howdy Homophones

Many speech and language students struggle with vocabulary. By breaking down vocabulary into different skills and strategies it helps them chunk them together to assist in understanding. One difficult concept is homophones.  Introducing, Howdy Homophones!

This activity pack will assist you as you introduce, practice, and review. In this pack you will find: visual aid with definition, matching cards with common homophones, and a game board that can be used with game cards provided (fill in blank with appropriate homophone and choices provided).  Keep reading for more information!  All you have to do is print and laminate!

Visual:  Many speech and language students are visual learners.  They have a difficult time recalling common concepts.  By providing visuals and reminders, it reduces the need for verbal cues and assistance.  I purposely used “look different” vs “different spelling.”  You can keep this visual on a dry erase board, smart board, or iPad as you use the other activities.

Matching Cards: It is important to demonstrate common words students may see in the general classroom.  If you give them the word verbally, can they give you the two definitions?  Show them the words/spelling once they provide the definitions.  Then you can use these cards for matching games to drill and review.

Game Board with fill in the blank game cards: Students must use context clues and understanding of homophones to complete the game cards provided.  Can student fill in blank using choices provided before rolling dice or spinning spinner to move along game board.  As students improve, you can cover up the choices.  Make them spell out on a mini dry erase board the correct homophone!

 

This activity pack is great for older elementary students.  To truly understand this concept they should be able to read.  For poor spellers, this is a great strategy for demonstrating that by changing spelling you are changing the meaning of the word (like minimal pairs).  To access this activity pack, click here for teachers pay teachers.  Let me know what you think and share strategies that work in your therapy room for working on homophones!